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Case studies

Follow the latest examples and outcomes of our sponsored research. Please use the filters to customise the listing on this page.

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Researchers funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) are driving innovations in semiconductor disk laser technology, combining physics and optical engineering techniques.

Decades of EPSRC support for pioneering work at the University of Southampton has been vital to drive a thriving photonics cluster in and around the city – a cluster crucial to the UK’s ability to punch above its weight in this here-and-now yet firmly future-focused sector.

A project funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) is providing real-time information on flooding in Mexico, using remote water sensing over cellular phone systems.

To celebrate International Women in Engineering day on 23 June 2021, we’ve put the spotlight on the work of Professor Eleanor Stride at the University of Oxford.

bp and The University of Manchester are leading a project to better understand and eliminate corrosion, supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council’s (EPSRC) Prosperity Partnership programme.

Supported by an Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) Impact Acceleration Account, this startup accelerator is helping students and staff at the University of Southampton change the world with their ideas.

A team of EPSRC-funded mathematicians, statisticians and computer scientists are driving the development and application of topological data analysis to improve existing data science techniques and solve real-world problems.

Long before COVID-19 exploded across the globe, the world of pharmaceuticals was transforming. Medicines’ journey from bench to bedside had to change in response to new pressures and possibilities on the one hand, an ageing population, rising healthcare costs and the increasing importance of environmental sustainability; on the other, exciting opportunities are being developed in western Scotland in personalised medicines and patient-centric healthcare.

Supported by EPSRC, computer modelling and stratified-flow wind-tunnel simulation is being used for the first time to improve the efficiency, reliability and operational life of large offshore wind farms.

EPSRC funded project is developing low-cost solar technologies that can make buildings energy self-sufficient.

Cybersecurity trailblazer Centre for Secure Information Technologies at Queen’s University Belfast has sparked the emergence of a thriving local hotbed of cybersecurity excellence with a rising global profile.

Vision and commitment, fresh investment, world-beating science – these key ingredients are enabling CSconnected, the world’s first compound semiconductor (CS) ‘cluster’, to take root and thrive in South Wales.

EPSRC supported engineers have created a low-cost early warning system for communities at risk of landslides.

EPSRC’s strong relationships with researchers, and flexible funding approach, meant that it could respond quickly to support the fast-developing research area of Mathematical Biology.

The recent acquisition of Ziylo, a University of Bristol spin-out company rooted in leading-edge EPSRC-funded chemistry research, could mark a major turning-point in the drive to develop safer, more effective treatment of diabetes.

In February 2018, Lizzy Yarnold sped to gold medal success in the skeleton event at the PyeongChang Winter Olympics – repeating her triumph four years earlier at the Sochi games in Russia. But her double achievement was not just a reward for her dedication and athleticism, it was also a triumph for UK engineering design.

A long-standing R&D collaboration between Professor Malcolm Smith, from the University of Cambridge, and legendary British supercar maker and Formula One giant, McLaren, has led to revolutionary suspension technology now employed in all Formula One cars, and which could have wider applications, such as in the railways of the future.

Professor Sanja Dogramadzi, from Bristol Robotics Laboratory (BRL), University of the West of England, has led the development of a ground-breaking robotic system that enables surgeons to put joint fractures back together using a minimally invasive approach. Supported by an underpinning EPSRC investment, it is the first robot-assisted system designed to deal with this problem. 

3D-printed implant technology developed with EPSRC support has transformed the life of Peter Maggs (pictured centre), a 71-year-old man who had been operated on to remove a large cancerous sarcoma that required surgeons to remove three ribs and part of his breastbone.

Every day the sun provides enough energy to power our planet for 27 years. So why not capture that energy with everyday buildings – using coatings that generate, store and release it?

Dr Conaill Soraghan, who leads the Operations & Maintenance Data Systems team at the Offshore Renewable Energy (ORE) Catapult, describes his career trajectory.

Around 80 billion litres of the fuel bioethanol are produced annually from fermented cereals. The yeast used in the process is discarded. Now, an academic/industry partnership led by Dr Emily Burton, from Nottingham Trent University, has led to a process that can retrieve proteins from what would otherwise have been discarded as cereal ‘waste’ which can then be used in chicken feed and commercial fish feed.

Researchers have used ARCHER, a state-of-the-art supercomputer, to create a model of the river channels in the Bengal delta – the largest river delta in the world – which will allow them to predict changes in tidal water level and salinity in the Bangladesh delta region, and to advise on irrigation and crop choice.

Permasense Ltd, a company formed in 2009 to commercialise industrial process monitoring technology for use in harsh conditions, pioneered by Dr Frederic Cegla while an EPSRC-supported doctoral student at Imperial College London, has been sold to Fortune 500 company Emerson for over £30 million.

Worldwide, 25 per cent of drinking water is lost through leaking water pipelines. To tackle this problem, Talib Alhinai, a research postgraduate at Imperial College London’s Aerial Robotics Laboratory, and his colleagues created the world’s first flying drone able to plug pipeline leaks.

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