Dr Kirill Cherednichenko

PhD

Photographic portrait of Kirill Cherednichenko

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Job title: Reader in Mathematics
Division: Mathematical Sciences
Organisation: University of Bath
Tags: Fellowship: Early Career Fellowship, Researcher, University of Bath
Related theme: Mathematical sciences

Biography

I graduated from St. Petersburg State University in 1998 with a degree in Partial Differential Equations, followed by a PhD from the University of Bath in 2001. I was Junior Research Fellow at St. John's College, Oxford, during 2001-2005 and Postdoctoral Associate at The Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics (DAMTP), Cambridge, in 2005-2006. I was then appointed as Lecturer (Senior Lecturer from 2011) at Cardiff University. I am now Reader in Mathematics at the University of Bath.

My Fellowship

A number of exciting useful properties of metamaterials have been observed or predicted by physicists, but a mathematical theory that would derive these 'in earnest' is still in its early stages. My project is aimed at making first steps in the direction of such a theory, and I would like to think of it as an ambitious programme bringing together advanced tools from mathematical analysis and physical intuition and knowledge.

Throughout my career I have been working on the development of analytical tools to study wave propagation in mechanics and electromagnetism and the behaviour of "composite" materials and materials with microstructure. My academic background is in classical asymptotic analysis but over time my interests expanded into homogenisation, operator theory and calculus of variations, albeit still often with an asymptotic flavour.

During the last few years I have approached a new way of studying properties of periodic composites and of so-called 'metamaterials', mathematical objects that emerge as the asymptotic limit of some composites. A number of exciting useful properties of metamaterials have been observed or predicted by physicists, but a mathematical theory that would derive these "in earnest" is still in its early stages. My project is aimed at making first steps in the direction of such a theory, and I would like to think of it as an ambitious programme bringing together advanced tools from mathematical analysis and physical intuition and knowledge. I hope that the Fellowship will help me establish a research group for analysis of metamaterials, which in the longer term may grow into a larger research centre.