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People

Profiles of people associated with EPSRC including Fellows, Council members and EPSRC staff. Please use the filters to customise the listing on this page.

227 results for Fellowship: Early Career Fellowship or Established Career Fellowship or Postdoctoral Fellowship
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Dave Adams obtained his PhD from the University of York. After postdoctoral work at York, Leeds and Leicester, he worked within Unilever for four years. He joined the University of Liverpool in 2008 before moving to the University of Glasgow in 2016. His research involves self-assembly, gels, and conductive materials.

Mark Ainslie received his PhD in Engineering from the University of Cambridge in 2012. Mark has over ten years of experience in the field of applied superconductivity in electrical engineering, and from 2012-2017, he was a Royal Academy of Engineering Research Fellow investigating superconducting electrical machine design.

Cameron Alexander is Professor of Polymer Therapeutics and Head of the Division of Drug Delivery and Tissue Engineering at the School of Pharmacy, University of Nottingham, UK.

  • Degree and PhD in Chemistry from University of Durham
  • Post-Doc at The Melville Laboratory for Polymer Synthesis, University of Cambridge
  • Joined the School of Pharmacy in Nottingham in 2005

Studied at Bristol University (PhD 1987). Worked at Los Alamos National Laboratory for two years before accepting a lectureship at Sussex University in 1989. Promoted to Professor in 2000 and moved to Sheffield University in 2004. Received five RSC medals and elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 2014. 

  • 2013- Crum Brown Chair of Chemistry, University of Edinburgh.
  • 2009- Chair of Synthetic Inorganic Chemistry, University of Edinburgh.
  • 2009-14 EPSRC Leadership Research Fellow, University of Edinburgh.
  • 2007-09 EaStCHEM Reader in Inorganic Chemistry, University of Edinburgh.

I am a Senior Lecturer in Forensic Analysis from the University of Surrey. I have developed forensic applications for Ion Beam Analysis and mass spectrometry techniques for many years, working with a number of law enforcement agencies.

Richard is a research fellow working at the University of Manchester. His work aims to combine synthetic biology with tissue engineering in order to create drug testing tools that are accurate, cheap and high-throughput.

I am the Chair in Molecular Bionics in the Department of Chemistry at the University College London (UCL). Prior to UCL, I held positions as Lecturer -2006, Senior Lecturer -2009 and Professor -2011 in the Departments of Materials Sci. Eng. (2006-2009) and Biomedical Science (2009-2013) at the University of Sheffield.

Professor Steve Beeby leads the Smart Electronic Materials and Systems (SEMS) group in the Department of Electronics and Computers Science at the University of Southampton.  He leads research into energy harvesting and e-textiles that has led to two spinout companies and over 250 publications. 

I obtained my PhD from the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Stockholm in 2005. From Stockholm I moved to Princeton where I became a Veblen Instructor at Princeton University and the Institute for Advanced Study. After that I stayed at Princeton as an Assistant Professor and in 2011 I came to the University of Oxford as a Lecturer in Analysis. I am also a Fellow of St. Anne's College.

After studying mathematics and physics at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jonathan moved to Brown University where he received his PhD in mathematics (2011). After spending time at Cambridge University (2011-2014), Imperial College London (2014-2016) and Durham University (2016), Jonathan is now a senior Lecturer at Cardiff University.

I joined the University of Cambridge as a lecturer in 2007. I became a Reader in Probability in 2012. I am also a fellow of King's college. Prior to hat I was educated in France and did a joint PhD thesis at Cornell University (USA) and Ecole Normale Supérieure (Paris), and continued as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada).

Susan is a University Academic Fellow (Assistant Professor) in Cementitious Materials at The University of Leeds, and her research focuses on the development, characterisation and exploitation of advanced and non-traditional cement and concrete technologies for sustainable infrastructure. 

My research concerns the development of materials for tissue repair and regeneration. I currently direct, together with Professor Ruth Cameron, the Cambridge Centre for Medical Materials, a group of around 25 post-docs and PhD students.

This is a job-share fellowship with Ruth Cameron.

I received my PhD in Physics from the University of Nottingham where I specialised in the development of MRI methodologies. I continued this work during postdoctoral positions in Nottingham, the University of California San Diego and the University of Oxford, before being awarded an EPSRC Early Career Fellowship in 2013.

I completed my BSc in Electronic Engineering in 2008 at Universidad de los Andes, Colombia, my MPhil in Nanotechnology in 2010 at the University of Cambridge, and my DPhil in Materials in 2015 at the University of Oxford studying new passivation technologies for silicon solar cells.

I obtained my PhD from Lund University in Sweden, and have previously held a Swedish Research Council Postdoctoral Stipend at University of Cambridge and a Leverhulme Early Career Fellowship at University of East Anglia.

I completed an MEng in Engineering Science at Oxford University (1995), a MSc in Climate Change and Sustainability (2009), and a PhD in Energy/ecological economics (2015).  Following a postdoctoral position at the University of Leeds (2015-2018), I have now taken up an EPSRC Early Career Fellowship at the University of Leeds (2018-2023).

I graduated from University College London with a first in Mathematics, followed by a PhD with Matt Keeling at the University of Warwick. After two postdoctoral positions at Harvard and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, I took up my fellowship at the University of Cambridge.

Jethro Browell is a Research Fellow at the University of Strathclyde's Institute for Energy and Environment where his research interests span all aspects of energy forecasting and associated decision-making in electricity markets and power system operation. 

David Butler is professor of water engineering, a chartered civil engineer and a fellow of the Institution of Civil Engineers, the Chartered Institution of Water & Environmental Management and the International Water Association. Following positions at Arups, London South Bank University and Imperial College London, he is now Director of the Centre for Water Systems at the University of Exeter.

Simon Byrne is an EPSRC Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Department of Statistical Science. He completed his PhD in 2011 at the University of Cambridge Statistical Laboratory under the supervision of Professor A. Philip Dawid. Prior to this, he worked as a statistical analyst in the general insurance industry.

I am a Reader in the Department of Computing at Imperial College London, where I lead the Software Reliability Group. I received a PhD in Computer Science from Stanford University, and Master’s and undergraduate degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. My research focuses on building practical techniques and tools for improving software quality, and spans the areas of software engineering, computer systems and security.

My research concerns medical materials and pharmaceutical materials science, a field I established within the Department when I joined it in 1993. I currently direct, together with Professor Serena Best, the Cambridge Centre for Medical Materials, a group of around 25 post-docs and PhD students.

This is a job-share fellowship with Serena Best.

My PhD on quantum computing theory began in 2005 at Oxford University. In 2008, the Royal Commission of 1851 awarded me a fellowship based at University College London.  From 2010, I held research posts at the University of Potsdam, the Free University of Berlin, and the University of Sheffield.

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